https://tech.slashdot.org/story/19/07/15/2314237/jet-powered-flyboard-soars-over-paris-for-bastille-day-parade?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
Jet-Powered Flyboard Soars Over Paris For Bastille Day Parade

New submitter HansiMeier33 shares a report from The Guardian: France's annual Bastille Day parade showcased European military cooperation and innovation on Sunday, complete with a French inventor hovering above Paris on a jet-powered flyboard. The former jetskiing champion and military reservist Franky Zapata clutched a rifle as he soared above the Champs-Elysees on his futuristic machine, which the French military helped to develop. The board, which was first created to fly above water, can reach speeds of up to 190km/h and can run for 10 minutes. The French armed forces minister, Florence Parly, said before the parade that the flyboard could "allow tests for different kinds of uses, for example as a flying logistical platform or, indeed, as an assault platform." Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2019-07-15 22:15:01
https://tech.slashdot.org/story/19/07/15/2318223/broadcom-and-symantec-end-buyout-talks?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
Broadcom and Symantec End Buyout Talks

phalse phace writes: Earlier this month, there was a report that Broadcom was in advance talks with Symantec about a possible buyout. It's being reported that those talks have now ended. "Symantec and Broadcom have ceased deal negotiations, sources tell CNBC's David Faber," reports CNBC. "The people familiar with the matter added that Symantec would not accept less than $28 a share. People familiar with the matter added that Broadcom indicated in early conversations that it would be willing to pay $28.25 per share for Symantec, but that following due diligence knocked that figure down below $28." Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2019-07-15 22:00:01
https://tech.slashdot.org/story/19/07/15/236255/ajit-pais-new-gift-to-cable-companies-would-kill-local-fees-and-rules?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
Ajit Pai's New Gift To Cable Companies Would Kill Local Fees and Rules

Ajit Pai is proposing a plan that would stop cities and towns from using their authority over cable TV networks to regulate internet access. His proposal, which is scheduled for a vote on August 1st, "would also limit the fees that municipalities can charge cable companies," reports Ars Technica. "Cable industry lobbyists have urged the FCC to stop cities and towns from assessing fees on the revenue cable companies make from broadband." From the report: If approved, Pai's proposal would "Prohibit LFAs [local franchising authorities] from using their video franchising authority to regulate most non-cable services, including broadband Internet service, offered over cable systems by incumbent cable operators." Pai's proposal complains that "some states and localities are purporting to assert authority" to collect fees and impose requirements that aren't explicitly allowed by Title VI, the cable-regulation section that Congress added to communications law with the Cable Act of 1984. Despite the Oregon Supreme Court ruling against Comcast, Pai's plan says "the majority of courts... have interpreted section 622(b) to prohibit states and localities from charging fees that exceed those expressly permitted by Title VI." Section 622 prevents local authorities from collecting more than 5 percent of a cable operator's gross revenue in any 12-month period. Pai's proposal also declares that "in-kind" contributions required by local franchising authorities must count toward that 5 percent cap, "with limited exceptions, including an exemption for certain capital costs related to public, educational, and governmental access (PEG) channels." But does the FCC have the power to preempt these local fees and requirements? "Having classified broadband as an information service (as part of its repeal of net neutrality rules), the Commission has determined that it is an unregulated service that it lacks regulatory authority over," consumer-advocacy group Public Knowledge wrote in a November 2018 filing that urged the FCC to drop the plan. The FCC cannot regulate or preempt local regulation of "any service that does not fall within its Title II jurisdiction over common carrier services or its Title I jurisdiction over matters 'incidental' to communication by wire," the group said. Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2019-07-15 21:00:01
https://tech.slashdot.org/story/19/07/15/1814219/ai-has-a-compute-dependency-problem-facebook-vp-says?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
AI Has a Compute Dependency Problem, Facebook VP Says

In one of his first public speaking appearances since joining Facebook to lead its AI initiatives, VP Jerome Pesenti expressed concern about the growing amount of compute power needed to create powerful AI systems. From a report: "I can tell you this is keeping me up at night," Pesenti said. "The peak compute companies like Facebook and Google can afford for an experiment, we are reaching that already." More software innovation will be required if artificial intelligence is to grow unhindered, he said, and optimization of hardware and software -- rather than brute force compute -- may be critical to AI in years ahead. [...] "We still see gains with increase of compute, but the pressure from the problem is just going to become bigger," Pesenti said. "I think we will still continue to use more compute, you will still net, but it will go slower, because you cannot keep pace with 10 times a year. That's just not possible." Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2019-07-15 17:30:01
https://tech.slashdot.org/story/19/07/15/185243/twitter-rebuilds-website-for-write-once-run-everywhere-philosophy?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
Twitter Rebuilds Website For 'Write Once, Run Everywhere' Philosophy

An anonymous reader writes: Twitter today began rolling out a new version of Twitter.com, rebuilt "from the ground up." The company says the project, which impacts the front end and the back end, has been years in the making. Twitter's biggest redesign in nearly seven years is meant to be a clean slate that will help the team more quickly bring new features and functionality to the site. On the front end, that means a faster and more personalized experience. On the back end, that means serving the right experience based on the user and device. The front end redesign brings Twitter's Explore feature from its apps to the website. That translates to more content like live video and local moments personalized to your location, context with profile information within conversations, and Top Trends in any view. Bookmarks, Lists, and Profile now have their own spots on the side navigation. Whether you have one profile or multiple, the site handles switching between accounts faster, also from the side navigation. You no longer have to login and logout. [...] Twitter has rebuilt the back end to support a site that is "personalized, efficient, faster, and more conversational." The Twitter web team says it needed to rebuild the back end from scratch because many of the problems stemmed from old architectural decisions. Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2019-07-15 16:15:02
https://arstechnica.com/?p=1536171 preview's
Lawrence of Arabia takes on Rasputin in first trailer for The King’s Man

Director Matthew Vaughan explores early 20th-century origins of fictional spy agency.
2019-07-15 15:00:01
https://games.slashdot.org/story/19/07/15/1712254/turbografx-16-mini-launches-in-march-with-50-ish-games?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
TurboGrafx-16 Mini Launches In March With 50-ish Games

You'll be able to complete the trifecta of tiny 16-bit throwback systems on March 19, 2020, when Konami releases the TurboGrafx-16 Mini. From a report: It'll include Dracula X, Bonk's Revenge, Gradius and many more games, including many Japanese exclusives. Konami said last week that it will sell the device exclusively through Amazon, with preorders opening up on Monday, July 15 during the online retailer's "Prime Day" promotion. The U.S. will get the TurboGrafx-shaped device shown above, while Japan will get a version modeled after the PC Engine and Europe's model will be styled after the CoreGrafx revision. No price has been announced for the U.S. model, but the Japanese one will cost 10,500 yen or around $100. The game library will be almost identical across all three systems, including 24 American versions of games and 26 Japanese versions. There is a little bit of overlap between the two -- for example, both the U.S. and Japanese versions of the action RPG Neutopia are included. That means it's not quite 50 games total, but it's still a rich lineup, which even includes CD-ROM games and some games from the Japanese SuperGrafx system. Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2019-07-15 14:15:01
https://arstechnica.com/?p=1536193 preview's
Why is there no smoking in Gears 5? It depends on who you ask

Either way, you won't see cigars dangling from COG mouths any time soon.
2019-07-15 12:45:02
https://arstechnica.com/?p=1534271 preview's
Flay your mind: Stranger Things S3 just might be the show’s best season yet

The Duffer Brothers raise the bar yet again with deft plotting, strong cast
2019-07-15 12:15:02
https://www.wired.com/story/marvel-storyboards-disney-plus preview's
*Storyboards*, Marvel's *Parts Unknown*, Is Coming to Disney+

The series, hosted by Marvel's chief creative officer Joe Quesada, will ask everyone from Hugh Jackman to Johnny Weir how they tell stories.
2019-07-15 12:15:02