https://packetstormsecurity.com/files/144220/USN-3420-2.txt preview's
Ubuntu Security Notice USN-3420-2

Ubuntu Security Notice 3420-2 - USN-3420-1 fixed vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. This update provides the corresponding updates for the Linux Hardware Enablement kernel from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. It was discovered that a buffer overflow existed in the Bluetooth stack of the Linux kernel when handling L2CAP configuration responses. A physically proximate attacker could use this to cause a denial of service. Various other issues were also addressed.
2018-09-18 09:58:00
https://packetstormsecurity.com/files/144219/USN-3419-2.txt preview's
Ubuntu Security Notice USN-3419-2

Ubuntu Security Notice 3419-2 - USN-3419-1 fixed vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel for Ubuntu 17.04. This update provides the corresponding updates for the Linux Hardware Enablement kernel from Ubuntu 17.04 for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. It was discovered that a buffer overflow existed in the Bluetooth stack of the Linux kernel when handling L2CAP configuration responses. A physically proximate attacker could use this to cause a denial of service. Various other issues were also addressed.
2018-09-18 09:57:00
https://packetstormsecurity.com/files/144218/USN-3419-1.txt preview's
Ubuntu Security Notice USN-3419-1

Ubuntu Security Notice 3419-1 - It was discovered that a buffer overflow existed in the Bluetooth stack of the Linux kernel when handling L2CAP configuration responses. A physically proximate attacker could use this to cause a denial of service. It was discovered that a buffer overflow existed in the Broadcom FullMAC WLAN driver in the Linux kernel. A local attacker could use this to cause a denial of service or possibly execute arbitrary code. Various other issues were also addressed.
2018-09-18 09:56:00
https://packetstormsecurity.com/files/144217/USN-3421-1.txt preview's
Ubuntu Security Notice USN-3421-1

Ubuntu Security Notice 3421-1 - It was discovered that Libidn2 incorrectly handled certain input. A remote attacker could possibly use this issue to cause Libidn2 to crash, resulting in a denial of service.
2018-09-18 09:55:00
https://packetstormsecurity.com/files/144216/USN-3346-2.txt preview's
Ubuntu Security Notice USN-3346-2

Ubuntu Security Notice 3346-2 - USN-3346-1 fixed vulnerabilities in Bind. The fix for CVE-2017-3142 introduced a regression in the ability to receive an AXFR or IXFR in the case where TSIG is used and not every message is signed. This update fixes the problem. In addition, this update adds the new root zone key signing key. Various other issues were also addressed.
2018-09-18 09:45:00
https://arstechnica.com/?p=1230903 preview's
Local Roots: Farm-in-a-box coming to a distribution center near you

Ars checks out shipping-container farming that’s said to have price parity with farms.
2017-12-16 17:00:01
https://www.wired.com/story/space-photos-of-the-week-where-stars-go-to-live-and-die preview's
Space Photos of the Week: Where Stars Go to Live and Die

The universe is full of nurseries incubating new stars—and when they finally explode, their remnants tell scientists about their stellar lives.
2017-12-16 16:00:00
https://arstechnica.com/?p=1233741 preview's
California: Here’s how to handle unfounded fears of cell phone cancer

There’s still no solid evidence that cell phones pose any risk.
2017-12-16 15:30:54
https://linux.slashdot.org/story/17/12/16/0320227/why-linux-hdcp-isnt-the-end-of-the-world?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
Why Linux HDCP Isn't the End of the World

"There is no reason for the open-source community to worry..." writes Daniel Stone, who heads the graphics team at open-source consultancy Collabora. mfilion quotes Collabora.com: Recently, Sean Paul from Google's ChromeOS team, submitted a patch series to enable HDCP support for the Intel display driver. HDCP is used to encrypt content over HDMI and DisplayPort links, which can only be decoded by trusted devices... However, if you already run your own code on a free device, HDCP is an irrelevance and does not reduce freedom in any way.... HDCP support is implemented almost entirely in the hardware. Rather than adding a mandatory encryption layer for content, the HDCP kernel support is dormant unless userspace explicitly requests an encrypted link. It then attempts to enable encryption in the hardware and informs userspace of the result. So there's the first out: if you don't want to use HDCP, then don't enable it! The kernel doesn't force anything on an unwilling userspace.... HDCP is only downstream facing: it allows your computer to trust that the device it has been plugged into is trusted by the HDCP certification authority, and nothing more. It does not reduce user freedom, or impose any additional limitations on device usage. Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2017-12-16 14:45:01
https://arstechnica.com/?p=1231835 preview's
Meet the legislator trying to do something about video game loot boxes

Hawaii’s Chris Lee wants to protect minors from “psychological manipulation”
2017-12-16 14:00:58