https://arstechnica.com/?p=1252533 preview's
Nintendo confirms Mario Kart Tour, launch window for Switch Online service

Investor call also reaffirmed plans for 3D-animated Super Mario film, other details.
2018-03-01 02:03:09
https://arstechnica.com/?p=1261863 preview's
Docu-comedy Poop Talk flushes stigma with full hour of well-formed humor

Gut-busting jokesters swirl around cultural and social aspects of dropping a deuce.
2018-02-18 15:00:04
https://www.wired.com/story/internet-week-158 preview's
Twitter's Reaction to McDonald's Changing the Happy Meal Tops This Week's Internet News

But the disappearing cheeseburger wasn't the only thing the internet was talking about last week. Catch up here.
2018-02-18 14:00:00
https://it.slashdot.org/story/18/02/18/1550236/contractors-pose-cyber-risk-to-government-agencies?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
Contractors Pose Cyber Risk To Government Agencies

Ian Barker, writing for BetaNews: While US government agencies are continuing to improve their security performance over time, the contractors they employ are failing to meet the same standards according to a new report. The study by security rankings specialist BitSight sampled over 1,200 federal contractors and finds that the security rating for federal agencies was 15 or more points higher than the mean of any contractor sector. It finds more than eight percent of healthcare and wellness contractors have disclosed a data breach since January 2016. Aerospace and defense firms have the next highest breach disclosure rate at 5.6 percent. While government has made a concerted effort to fight botnets in recent months, botnet infections are still prevalent among the government contractor base, particularly for healthcare and manufacturing contractors. The study also shows many contractors are not following best practices for network encryption and email security. Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2018-02-18 12:45:01
https://www.wired.com/story/mechanical-turk-olympics preview's
The Quest to Recreate the Olympics with Mechanical Turk

Why one Texas professor pays Turkers to post themselves doing Olympic events on YouTube.
2018-02-18 12:00:00
https://www.wired.com/story/sam-cossman-profile preview's
Sam Cossman’s Crazy-Fun, World-Improving, Somewhat Improbable Universe

How an idealistic entrepreneur turns wild experiences into viral videos into actual science into a going business concern.
2018-02-18 12:00:00
https://developers.slashdot.org/story/18/02/18/1633227/who-killed-the-junior-developer?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
Who Killed The Junior Developer?

Melissa McEwen, writing on Medium: A few months ago I attended an event for women in tech. A lot of the attendees were new developers, graduates from code schools or computer science programs. Almost everyone told me they were having trouble getting their first job. I was lucky. My first "real" job out of college was "Junior Application developer" at Columbia University in 2010. These days it's a rare day to find even a job posting for a junior developer position. People who advertise these positions say they are inundated with resumes. But on the senior level companies complain they can't find good developers. Gee, I wonder why? I'm not really sure the exact economics of this, because I don't run these companies. But I know what companies have told me: "we don't hire junior developers because we can't afford to have our senior developers mentor them." I've seen the rates for senior developers because I am one and I had project managers that had me allocate time for budgeting purposes. I know the rate is anywhere from $190-$300 an hour. That's what companies believe they are losing on junior devs. Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2018-02-18 11:45:01
https://it.slashdot.org/story/18/02/18/1537257/uss-greatest-vulnerability-is-ignoring-the-cyber-threats-from-our-adversaries-foreign-policy-expert-says?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
US's Greatest Vulnerability is Ignoring the Cyber Threats From Our Adversaries, Foreign Policy Expert Says

America's greatest vulnerability is its continued inability to acknowledge the extent of its adversaries' capabilities when it comes to cyber threats, says Ian Bremmer, founder and president of leading political risk firm Eurasia Group. From a report: Speaking to CNBC from the Munich Security Conference on Saturday, the prominent American political scientist emphasized that there should be much more government-level concern and urgency over cyber risk. The adversarial states in question are what U.S. intelligence agencies call the "big four": Russia, China, North Korea, and Iran. "We're vulnerable because we continue to underestimate the capabilities in those countries. WannaCry, from North Korea -- no one in the U.S. cybersecurity services believed the North Koreans could actually do that," Bremmer described, naming the ransomware virus that crippled more than 200,000 computer systems across 150 countries in May of 2017. Borge Brende, president of the World Economic Forum, weighed in, stressing the economic cost of cyber crimes. "It is very hard to attribute cyberattacks to different actors or countries, but the cost is just unbelievable. Annually more than a thousand billion U.S. dollars are lost for companies or countries due to these attacks and our economy is more and more based on internet and data." Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2018-02-18 10:45:01
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxjournalcom/~3/T8jvHIzrdx8/introducing-spyder-scientific-python-development-environment preview's
Introducing Spyder, the Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment

If you want to use Anaconda for science projects, one of the first things to consider is the spyder package, which is included in the basic Anaconda installation. Spyder is short for Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment. Think of it as an IDE for scientific programming within Python. more>>
2018-02-18 09:15:42
https://tech.slashdot.org/story/18/02/18/0740228/facebook-plans-to-use-us-mail-to-verify-ids-of-election-ad-buyers?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
Facebook Plans To Use US Mail To Verify IDs of Election Ad Buyers

Facebook will start using postcards sent by U.S. mail later this year to verify the identities and location of people who want to purchase U.S. election-related advertising on its site, a senior company executive said on Saturday. From a report: The postcard verification is Facebook's latest effort to respond to criticism from lawmakers, security experts and election integrity watchdog groups that it and other social media companies failed to detect and later responded slowly to Russia's use of their platforms to spread divisive political content, including disinformation, during the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2018-02-18 05:15:01