https://hardware.slashdot.org/story/18/04/24/2333259/a-study-finds-half-of-jobs-are-vulnerable-to-automation?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
A Study Finds Half of Jobs Are Vulnerable To Automation

The Economist reports of a new working paper by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) that assesses the automatability of each task within a given job, based on a survey of skills in 2015. "Overall, the study finds that 14% of jobs across 32 countries are highly vulnerable, defined as having at least a 70% chance of automation," reports Economist. "A further 32% were slightly less imperiled, with a probability between 50% and 70%. At current employment rates, that puts 210 million jobs at risk across the 32 countries in the study." From the report: The pain will not be shared evenly. The study finds large variation across countries: jobs in Slovakia are twice as vulnerable as those in Norway. In general, workers in rich countries appear less at risk than those in middle-income ones. But wide gaps exist even between countries of similar wealth. Differences in organizational structure and industry mix both play a role, but the former matters more. In South Korea, for example, 30% of jobs are in manufacturing, compared with 22% in Canada. Nonetheless, on average, Korean jobs are harder to automate than Canadian ones are. This may be because Korean employers have found better ways to combine, in the same job, and without reducing productivity, both routine tasks and social and creative ones, which computers or robots cannot do. A gloomier explanation would be "survivor bias": the jobs that remain in Korea appear harder to automate only because Korean firms have already handed most of the easily automatable jobs to machines. Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2018-04-24 21:45:02
https://arstechnica.com/?p=1298601 preview's
Apple releases iOS 11.3.1 alongside security updates for macOS 10.13.4

New updates for iPhones, iPads, and Macs address bugs and vulnerabilities.
2018-04-24 20:15:02
https://hardware.slashdot.org/story/18/04/24/2132201/electric-buses-are-hurting-the-oil-industry?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
Electric Buses Are Hurting the Oil Industry

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Bloomberg: Electric buses were seen as a joke at an industry conference in Belgium seven years ago when the Chinese manufacturer BYD showed an early model. Suddenly, buses with battery-powered motors are a serious matter with the potential to revolutionize city transport -- and add to the forces reshaping the energy industry. With China leading the way, making the traditional smog-belching diesel behemoth run on electricity is starting to eat away at fossil fuel demand. The numbers are staggering. China had about 99 percent of the 385,000 electric buses on the roads worldwide in 2017, accounting for 17 percent of the country's entire fleet. Every five weeks, Chinese cities add 9,500 of the zero-emissions transporters -- the equivalent of London's entire working fleet, according Bloomberg New Energy Finance. All this is starting to make an observable reduction in fuel demand. And because they consume 30 times more fuel than average sized cars, their impact on energy use so far has become much greater than the than the passenger sedans produced companies from Tesla to Toyota. For every 1,000 battery-powered buses on the road, about 500 barrels a day of diesel fuel will be displaced from the market, according to BNEF calculations. This year, the volume of fuel buses take off the market may rise 37 percent to 279,000 barrels a day, about as much oil as Greece consumes, according to BNEF. Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2018-04-24 19:30:06
https://hardware.slashdot.org/story/18/04/24/213245/samsung-announces-970-pro-and-970-evo-nvme-ssds?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
Samsung Announces 970 PRO and 970 EVO NVMe SSDs

hyperclocker shares a report from AnandTech: Samsung has announced the third generation of their high-end consumer NVMe SSDs. The new 970 PRO and 970 EVO M.2 NVMe SSDs use a newer controller and Samsung's latest 64-layer 3D NAND flash memory. The outgoing 960 PRO and 960 EVO were first announced in September 2016 and shipped that fall, so they have had a fairly long run as Samsung's flagship consumer SSDs. Compared to its predecessor, the 970 EVO promises a small improvement in sequential read speed, and a more substantial boost to sequential write speed for all but the smallest 250GB model. Peak random access performance is also substantially improved, but again the 250GB model gets left out, and is actually rated as slower than the 960 EVO 250GB. The warranty on the EVO has been extended from three years to five years, and the write endurance ratings have been increased by 50% to retain almost the same drive writes per day rating. The 970 PRO's performance specs aren't too different from the 970 EVO. Many of the ratings are the same, and the ones that differ are mostly better by just 3-11% for the PRO. There are just two major exceptions to this. First, the PRO doesn't rely on SLC write caching so it can maintain its write speed far longer than the EVO. Second, the rated write endurance of the 970 PRO is twice that of the EVO, going from just over 0.3 Drive Writes Per Day to 0.6 DWPD. Neither of these are an important factor for ordinary consumer use cases, but they help the 970 PRO retain some shine as a premium product. Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2018-04-24 18:30:01
https://arstechnica.com/?p=1298229 preview's
Windows goes on a diet with yet another variant: Windows 10 Lean

Latest Insider build has a strange new SKU.
2018-04-24 14:15:07
https://arstechnica.com/?p=1298225 preview's
Here’s our best look yet at the LG G7

The G7 has a notched design, headphone jack, and physical Google Assistant button.
2018-04-24 12:00:02